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World Heritage Sites

  1. bath
    The City of Bath in South West England was founded in the 1st century AD by the Romans who used the natural hot springs as a thermal spa. It became an important centre for the wool industry in the Middle Ages but developed and flourished as a fashionable spa resort in the Georgian era.
  2. Blenheim Palace is only 8 miles from Oxford, and boasts more than 300 years of history to discover and over 2000 acres of beautiful parkland to explore.
    1. 0001/01/019999/12/31
  3. durham
    Durham Cathedral was built between the late 11th and early 12th century to house the bodies of St. Cuthbert (634-687 AD) (the evangeliser of Northumbria) and the Venerable Bede (672/3-735 AD).
  4. Canterbury Cathedral is the jewel in Kent’s crown: UNESCO World Heritage Site, Mother Church of the Anglican Communion, and seat of the Archbishop of Canterbury.
    1. giant
      The Giant’s Causeway lies at the foot of the basalt cliffs along the sea coast on the edge of the Antrim plateau in Northern Ireland.
    2. cornwall
      The deep underground mines, engine houses, foundries, new towns, smallholdings, ports and harbours, and their ancillary industries reflect prolific innovation which, in the early 19th century, enabled the region to produce two-thirds of the world’s supply of copper.
    3. edinburgh
      Edinburgh has been the Scottish capital since the 15th century. It has two distinct areas: the Old Town, dominated by a medieval fortress; and the neoclassical New Town, whose development from the 18th century onwards had a far-reaching influence on European urban planning.
    4. conway castle
      The four castles of Beaumaris, Conwy, Caernarfon, Harlech and the attendant fortified towns at Conwy and Caernarfon in Gwynedd, North Wales, are the finest examples of late 13th century and early 14th century military architecture in Europe, as demonstrated through their completeness, pristine state, evidence for organized domestic space, and extraordinary repertory of their medieval architectural form.
    5. derwent
      The Derwent valley, upstream from Derby on the southern edge of the Pennines, contains a series of 18th and 19th century cotton mills and an industrial landscape of high historical and technological significance.
    6. lake
      Located in northwest England, the English Lake District is a mountainous area, whose valleys have been modelled by glaciers in the Ice Age and subsequently shaped by an agro-pastoral land-use system characterized by fields enclosed by walls.
    7. fountains
      Studley Royal Park is one of the few great 18th century gardens to survive substantially in its original form and one of the most spectacular water gardens in England. In addition, the ruins of Fountains Abbey are not only a key eye catcher in the garden scheme, but also one of the few Cistercian houses to survive from the 12th century.
    8. hadrian
      Hadrian’s Wall stretches 70 miles across the north of England from Cumbrian Roman coastal defences at Ravenglass to Wallsend on the east coast.
    9. jod
      Located in a rural area of northwest England, free from radio interference, Jodrell Bank is one of the world’s leading radio astronomy observatories
    10. ironbridge
      Ironbridge is known throughout the world as the symbol of the Industrial Revolution.
    11. kew
      Since their creation in 1759, the Royal Botanic Gardens have made a significant contribution to the study of plant diversity and economic botany and formed a unique testimony to developments in garden art that were subsequently diffused around the world.
    12. slate
      This post-industrial landscape holds a special place in the hearts of the people who live here and the cultural and social influence is still significant today.
    13. greenwich
      Maritime Greenwich encompasses international significant architecture and landscape, artistic achievement, scientific endeavour and royal association which together tell the story of Britain at sea, and of world time keeping, navigation and exploration.
    14. liverpool
      Six areas in the historic centre and docklands of the maritime mercantile City of Liverpool bear witness to the development of one of the world’s major trading centres in the 18th and 19th centuries.
    15. westminster
      The Palace of Westminster, Westminster Abbey, and St Margaret’s Church together encapsulate the history of one of the most ancient parliamentary monarchies of present times and the growth of parliamentary and constitutional institutions.
    16. saltaire
      Saltaire is an exceptionally complete and well-preserved industrial village of the second half of the 19th century. Its textile mills, public buildings, and workers’ housing are built in a harmonious style of high architectural quality and the urban plan survives intact, giving an outstanding example of the philanthropic approach to industrial management.
    17. antonine
      From Old Kilpatrick in the west to near Bo’ness in the east, the Antonine Wall was around 37 miles (60km) long when completed in 142 AD. The wall featured ridges, crests and escarpments to create a forbidding boundary and visible barrier at the Roman Empire’s north-west frontier.
    18. stonehenge
      The Stonehenge, Avebury and Associated Sites World Heritage Site is internationally important for its complexes of outstanding prehistoric monuments. Stonehenge is the most architecturally sophisticated prehistoric stone circle in the world, while Avebury is the largest.
    19. The Tower of London spans over 900 years of British history. Fortress, palace, prison, arsenal and garrison, it is one of the most famous fortified buildings in the world, and houses the Crown Jewels, armouries, Yeoman Warders and ravens.
      1. forth
        The Forth Bridge, which spans the estuary (Firth) of the River Forth in eastern Scotland to link Fife to Edinburgh by railway, was the world’s earliest great multispan cantilever bridge, and at 2,529 m remains one of the longest. It opened in 1890 and continues to operate as an important passenger and freight rail bridge.
      2. blaenavon
        The area around Blaenavon is evidence of the pre-eminence of South Wales as the world’s major producer of iron and coal in the 19th century.
      3. standing stones
        The Heart of Neolithic Orkney lies in a wider archaeological landscape rich with remains from the Neolithic times and later periods.
      4. lanark
        New Lanark is a small 18th- century village set in a sublime Scottish landscape where the philanthropist and Utopian idealist Robert Owen moulded a model industrial community in the early 19th century.
      5. pontcysylite
        Situated in north-eastern Wales, the 18 kilometre long Pontcysyllte Aqueduct and Canal is a feat of civil engineering of the Industrial Revolution.
      6. st kilda
        As one of only a few mixed natural and cultural World Heritage Sites, St Kilda is Europe’s most important seabird colony and one of the major seabird breeding stations in the North Atlantic.
      7. coast
        The Dorset and East Devon Coast has an outstanding combination of globally significant geological and geomorphological features. The property comprises eight sections along 155km of largely undeveloped coast.

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